Halifax

Waye Mason For District 7

Well, no blog posts for a while!  Why you ask?  Because this happened today: Today I launch my campaign to become the councillor for the new District 7 Peninsula South Downtown. In just over eight months, on October 20th 2012, the citizens of Halifax Regional Municipality will have a chance to vote for change. As the councillor for District 7, –more–

Halifax

OPENFILE: The New Bridge Terminal – Hope for Transit That Works

Right now, the best example of HRM “getting it right” is probably the construction of the new Dartmouth Bridge terminal. The current “terminal” deserves quotes around its description. HRM is replete with clusters of bus shelters, some heated, most not, with the grandiose designation of “terminal.” Anyone coming from a larger city, or accustomed to taking the Dartmouth Ferry, finds –more–

Halifax

OPENFILE: The windows are closed, again

Reality TV is still a big deal, right? Sure, sitcoms are ascendant (my favorite is Community, of course) butSurvivor is still on, The Amazing Race is a huge hit, and of course almost every show on the Food Network. As of last night, my favorite reality show is HRM Council. Watching them debate reconsideration of the sale of St. Pat’s-Alexandra School was an intense roller-coaster ride, like some –more–

Halifax

GUEST BLOGGER: It is Africville all over again

“It is Africville all over again,” Reverend Rhonda Britton said at City Hall after council voted to approve the sale of St. Patrick’s-Alexandra school, in the heart of Central Halifax, to a developer. That’s a hard thing for residents of Halifax Regional Municipality to hear, judging from letters to the editor and comments on-line at cbc.ca. –more–

Halifax

OPENFILE: Peter Kelly, Newsmaker of 2011

It seems inarguable that mayor Kelly was 2011’s Halifax newsmaker of the year, and not in a good way. Try as I might to find another angle, or another way to spin it, the most recurring theme this year in Halifax politics was the mayor’s role in the various scandals and leadership crises that plagued HRM for much of 2011. –more–

Halifax

OPENFILE: UARB decides for HRM. Again.

On Tuesday the great and powerful Utility and Review Board delivered its verdict on the shape of the municipal districts in the next election in HRM. The UARB—as its’ friends know it—had already decided on the size of council back in the summer. Downsizing council from 23 to 16 required re-districting, and the UARB had ordered HRM to report back with a –more–

Education

OPENFILE: NSCADs gotta know when to hold ’em

If you like NSCAD, the current situation has been hard to talk about. It is kind of like having a friend—smart, accomplished, successful, arguably world renowned— with a gambling problem. A smart friend, who you admire, who is about to lose her house because she is running out of money and time. NSCAD has $21 million annual budget, a $19 million dollar debt, –more–

Commercial Use

From the Facebook page of Peter Kelly, Mayor

This dialog, take from Mayor Peter Kelly’s public Facebook page, was captured around 9:55pm the night of November 11, 2011. Update – it has not been deleted, the nice folks at the Mayor’s office have only deleted the stuff on the top page, not the commenting on the Remembrance Day photo album.  That is now 280 comments long. I have –more–

Commercial Use

HRM District Proposals – the good, the bad, the ugly.

The fat is in the fire now!  People are seeing that downsizing from 23 to 16 councillors will really redefine the representative districts boundaries.  People can see what they will gain, and what they will lose.  Staff quietly put the proposed boundaries for the smaller 16 representative council online late Friday, at quitting time or there abouts. This meant that alert internet –more–